Are you participating, or visiting?

I’m traveling this week spending time with family at a quiet beach on the “forgotten coast” of Florida. My work consists of chatting, eating, kayaking, biking, walking, writing, and reading. It’s bliss :).

Poet Mary Oliver

Here’s a quick reminder from poet Mary Oliver about how important it is to participate, truly participate, in your life. Thanks to Jonathan Fields at The Good Life Project for posting this earlier this week. Continue reading

Eyerolls and sighs

I’m a big believer in following a high energy path with anything you’re working on. If you don’t feel energy at the center of your body when you think about next steps in what you’re doing, it may be time for a change.

Eye rolls and sighs are your body’s clue that you’re on a low energy path. Sometimes these are obvious – oh, my! But sometimes only you can see and hear them like maybe when: Continue reading

The importance of being playful

We had Christopher Phillips in as a speaker at the library this week. Chris is the author of Socrates Cafe and Democracy Cafe which we used to model some of our programs at the library. Chris is an interesting, engaging, fun guy so we asked him back to talk about his latest book, A Child at Heart: Unlocking Your Creativity, Curiosity, and Reason at Every Age and Stage of Life

Here are some of my favorite take-aways from Chris’s talk: Continue reading

What do you do?

For those of us who have a number of jobs, it’s tricky answering the simple question, “What do you do?” People like clarity and telling someone “what you do” helps them understand who you are and how you fit within the community. If you hesitate answering, you see them smile and take a step away. People who can’t say what they do are suspicious!

But what if you’re retired? Then you end up explaining “what you used to do.”

What if you don’t have a job? How do you define yourself then?

And what if you do volunteer work. Is that “what you do?”

And how about when the job you have doesn’t define you in any way? “Well, this is what I do but I don’t really like it.” Continue reading

Add some G-BOMBS to your diet

Healthy people get stuff done. We are focused. We have good energy. We are productive.

A huge, huge part of being healthy and feeling great depends on the food you put in your body. If you feel bad after eating – you’re tired, acidic, foggy – that’s your body’s way of telling you that something is not right. If this is happening to you, track what you eat and how you feel after eating for a week or so, and then start experimenting to isolate the variables. Continue reading

Add a spoonful of JOY

When people are struggling to get organized, the weirdest piece of advice I give them is to add something to their to-do list: Joy. It is counter-intuitive. Why not just focus on the multitude of tasks at hand?

Because if you’re struggling, it means you don’t want to tackle the tasks at hand. They seem like chores. They’re heavy. They’re things that have to be done. Yep. So add one more: Joy.

Continue reading

What you can learn from the cells in your body

“Plant both feet firmly in the ether.”
Bruce Lipton, The Biology of Belief

I just finished Bruce Lipton’s book, The Biology of Belief. Here’s the premise. We’re made up of over 37 trillion cells that work together in amazing ways. If we can do that as cells, can we also do that as individuals and as a society?

What’s cool about cells is that they each have a built-in road map (DNA), but DNA is triggered by the environment the cell lives in; DNA by itself can’t take action. In a healthy environment, a cell thrives. In a toxic environment, a cell dies. In between, proteins that coat the DNA open up to expose some DNA traits and hide others.

If you want to avoid catastrophic illness, you give yourself the best shot at health by eating well, watching your weight, exercising, meditating, and being happy. Healthy living isn’t a guarantee you won’t have to deal with illness, but it gives you the best shot at keeping those cellular proteins wrapped tightly around potential DNA triggers.

I have two big take-aways on this. Continue reading