Breaking out of a food rut

I don’t know about you but I tend to eat the same types of food for long periods of time. Before I gave up meat, I had a year where I ate roast chicken weekly if not daily. Another year it was turkey on pita. The year I was pregnant with my second daughter, it was roast beef sandwiches. When Bea was born, she weighed just under 11 pounds and was almost 2 feet tall. She is clearly made of iron!

I gave up meat about 12 years ago but still have binge foods – spinach, salmon, nuts. Recently, my daily fare includes spicy almonds and guacamole. These aren’t bad for me, but when you eat the same foods over and over, you can overwhelm your body with certain “same” ingredients. And you may miss out on hearing cues your body is telling you about new things to eat. Continue reading

In defense of chewing your food!

Smoothies are all the rage and when you drink one, you feel awesome. You just consumed enough fruit and vegetables to get you through the day!

The goal is wonderful, but the vehicle isn’t.

Here’s the thing. Liquids process so quickly in your body, your body hardly knows they’re there. That’s true no matter what you drink which is why water is always your best bet.

But you drink smoothies partly for the fiber they contain. Doesn’t that take a little longer for your body to process? Nope. Continue reading

Are you participating, or visiting?

I’m traveling this week spending time with family at a quiet beach on the “forgotten coast” of Florida. My work consists of chatting, eating, kayaking, biking, walking, writing, and reading. It’s bliss :).

Poet Mary Oliver

Here’s a quick reminder from poet Mary Oliver about how important it is to participate, truly participate, in your life. Thanks to Jonathan Fields at The Good Life Project for posting this earlier this week. Continue reading

Add some G-BOMBS to your diet

Healthy people get stuff done. We are focused. We have good energy. We are productive.

A huge, huge part of being healthy and feeling great depends on the food you put in your body. If you feel bad after eating – you’re tired, acidic, foggy – that’s your body’s way of telling you that something is not right. If this is happening to you, track what you eat and how you feel after eating for a week or so, and then start experimenting to isolate the variables. Continue reading

The Food Revolution Summit is coming right up!

If you’re not healthy, it’s hard to get organized. And what’s at the core of good health? Good food!

Every April, the Food Revolution Network holds a free online Summit with a mix of speakers talking about the latest in food health. That may sound dry, but I’ve listened for the past 5 years and the content is always insightful and helpful. The speakers are top-notch; many are doctors with new ideas about food-health. And it’s free – as long as you resist buying their “empowerment” package! Continue reading

What you can learn from the cells in your body

“Plant both feet firmly in the ether.”
Bruce Lipton, The Biology of Belief

I just finished Bruce Lipton’s book, The Biology of Belief. Here’s the premise. We’re made up of over 37 trillion cells that work together in amazing ways. If we can do that as cells, can we also do that as individuals and as a society?

What’s cool about cells is that they each have a built-in road map (DNA), but DNA is triggered by the environment the cell lives in; DNA by itself can’t take action. In a healthy environment, a cell thrives. In a toxic environment, a cell dies. In between, proteins that coat the DNA open up to expose some DNA traits and hide others.

If you want to avoid catastrophic illness, you give yourself the best shot at health by eating well, watching your weight, exercising, meditating, and being happy. Healthy living isn’t a guarantee you won’t have to deal with illness, but it gives you the best shot at keeping those cellular proteins wrapped tightly around potential DNA triggers.

I have two big take-aways on this. Continue reading

Walking the Artist’s Path

I met last night with a group of 11 women to start working our way through the book The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron. I read this book about 20 years ago with a couple of friends. Reading it got me back into the theater – first teaching it to kids. That lead to getting back on stage. Then I started writing for the theater, and now I’m writing, directing, and running a theater group. All good. All high energy!

What I like about The Artist’s Way is that it assumes that creativity is part of everyone’s nature but that it can get lost in the day-to-day shuffle of life. The book has fun, simple exercises that help you remember who you are and get you back to practicing “the art of creative living.” Continue reading